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Mission and Vision

Our mission:
The Red Tent Women’s Project is a diverse and dynamic community of women who are catalysts for social change. By creating safe and empowered spaces we facilitate community building, information and resource exchange, and personal growth for women and girls.

As we seek to meet our goals through our program activities, we will create easily accessible, safe, and healing spaces for women of all races, ethnicities, ages, spiritual paths, shapes, sexual orientations, countries of origin, citizenship statuses, sizes, and socioeconomic levels. And whatever else we might not have thought of. And...we encourage you to tell us what we might not have thought of.

The overarching goals are to share information, to generate discussion and dialogue on issues, and above all, to empower women to effect change in the public consciousness and in themselves.

In order to meet the goals, we have identified the following program areas;
a) Creating a social networking website where women can share information, link with other women and organizations dedicated to empowering and educating women and girls, and create social change.
b) Holding workshops, information sessions and support groups on an infinite number of subjects.
c) Operating a fiscal sponsorship plan for individuals and groups working on projects that seek to empower women.

As we seek to meet our goals through our program activities, we will create an easily accessible community of women of all races, ethnicities, ages, spiritual paths, shapes, sexual orientations, countries of origin, citizenship statuses, sizes, and socioeconomic levels.

About Us

The Red Tent Women's Project is entirely volunteer run and staffed by a dedicated board of directors. We make our decisions by utilizing a consensus model adapted from the Oberlin Student Cooperative Assocation (OSCA), where a couple of board members got their undergraduate degrees.

Our Board of Directors:
Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan, Pangea Diversity Services
Erin Falah, MPA, Legal Aid
Alejandra Lora, Immigration Specialist
Eryka Peskin, LMSW, Red Tent Women’s Project
Terri Robinson da Silva, LMSW, Social Worker, Educational Alliance
Angela L. Scott, MSW, Social Worker
Affiliations are for identification only.

In the two years we have been open,
• Over 700 women have attended over 100 events, activities, and drop-in hours,
• We have been highlighted in the New York Times and Womensenews.com,
• We have changed women’s lives. Here are some stories:

At our Women’s Writing Group, Rose said that she had never been able to write about her experiences with violence. That day, with the group’s support, she wrote...and shared, and moved us all.

Callen, a talented performer, wasn’t sure she could handle the business and promotion end of the industry. After she attended our Get the Gig! press packet workshop, she discovered she could indeed face the business aspects, and handle them well.

Irene discovered our brochure in a local store. After a particularly hard day of caring for her ill father, she decided to visit the Red Tent. She intended to drop by for a few minutes and instead found herself here for hours, discovering books in our library and meeting other women. Eileen has since used our library and mediation space, and attended several events, including the Women’s Writing Group and the Non-Violent Communication workshop.

Why a "red tent"?
In many cultures, such as Chinese, some African cultures, and the Romany culture, red is a symbolic color of strength or female power. The tent itself is rooted in an ancient Judeo-Christian-Islamic history of women’s gathering spaces. Women used to go to the red tent while they were giving birth or menstruating—they had to because the men in their communities feared contamination from these biological processes. Yet in the end, the red tents became community spaces where women went to learn from one another, to be in community, and above all, to celebrate life. We draw upon these numerous rich traditions when we call the project a Red Tent.